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GENERAL RADIOLOGIST MOSTLY WORK AS MULTISPECIALISTS 

By Erik L. Ridley

General radiologists in the U.S. mostly work as multispecialists with specific areas of subspecialty focus, and nearly all have at least one of these subspecialty focus areas, according to research from the Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy .

To assess the individual work efforts of radiologists, a research team led by Andrew Rosenkrantz, MD, utilized the 2017 Medicare Provider and Other Supplier Public Use File and a previously validated work relative value unit (RVU) weighted claims-based classification system.

They found that 85 percent of radiologists deemed to be generalists had two or more subspecialty focus areas.

“The predominance of general radiologists’ multispecialty focus across various practice types and locations supports their role in facilitating patient access to a range of radiologist subspecialties,” Dr. Rosenkrantz said in a statement.

In their analysis published in the May issue of Academic Radiology, the researchers categorized generalists as radiologists who did not spend more than 50 percent of their work effort in a single specialty.

A threshold of more than 25 percent subspecialty work effort was used to determine a subspecialty focus area. The researchers classified generalists with two or more subspecialty focus areas as “multi-specialists.”

Of the 12,438 radiologists considered to be generalists, 85 percent had two or more subspecialty focus areas of more than 25 percent work effort, 14.6 percent had one focus area, and 0.4 percent had no focus area, according to the researchers. The fraction of generalists meeting multi-specialist criteria was similar across years in practice, academic versus nonacademic status, and practice size (Academic Radiology, May 2020, Vol. 27:5, pp. 715-719).

The researchers did find, though, a geographical variance among general radiologist multi-specialization, ranging from 58 percent in Vermont to 94 percent in Wyoming. These percentages were not associated with state-level population density.

“A more complete understanding of practice patterns both general and subspecialty radiologists could help inform important ongoing conversations within radiology about training, staffing, and workforce planning — all aimed at ensuring robust access to high-quality imaging services,” said senior author Richard Duszak Jr., MD. VTN

 

Erik L. Ridley is an AuntMinnie staff writer. This article is published with permission.

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Larry Storer

Larry Storer

Larry Storer has been editor of Vein Therapy News for 10 years. He has edited computer, shelter and medical publications at Publications & Communications LP for 30 years. He was also a corporate vice president and editorial director before retiring. Larry graduated from Baylor University with a BA in journalism and an MA in communications; and from Lamar University with a MED in school administration. He taught beginning and advanced reporting, beginning and advanced editing and editorial writing at Baylor University. Larry was a reporter, and city and news editor of the Beaumont Journal, and opinion editor at the Beaumont Enterprise and Beaumont Enterprise-Journal. He was also the founding managing editor of the Yuba City (California) Daily Independent-Herald.