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MEMORIAL DESIGNATED FOR BROCK GEBHARDT

Brock William Gebhardt, 23, of Edelstein, Ill., passed away Thursday, Aug. 7, 2014, at OSF Saint Francis Medical Center in Peoria, Ill.

Brock was born on April 19, 1991, in Peoria to Theodore W. Gebhardt and Peggy (Kortz) Bush. He is the son of Ron and Peggy Bush.

Brock graduated with a bachelor's degree from the University of Illinois at Champaign in 2013, double majoring in economics and political science. He was elected and served as student body president his senior year. He was a founding member of the U of I Chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa. He was also a member of the Association of Big Ten Students and the U of I Urbana-Champaign Illinois Board of Higher Education.

An aviation enthusiast, he enjoyed flying a four-passenger aircraft, receiving his pilot's license at age 17. Conservative politics was another passion, having worked in the Republican House in Springfield, Ill., after graduation from college. Working hard on several Illinois campaigns, he was a key member for the election of Ryan Spain to the Peoria City Council. Most recently, he served as store manager for Central Pool Supply in Peoria and as marketing consultant for Vein Experts.org.

Brock leaves his earthly life in the spirit of giving as an organ donor for the Gift of Hope.

Life's Path learning center will be dedicated to Brock carrying on his love of knowledge and learning. The learning center will empower children in Haiti to learn helping them overcome the obstacles of an impoverished life. Carry on Brock's love of learning, leadership, and compassion by making a memorial contribution to Life's Path, changing one life at a time.

If you'd like to make a donation to Life's Path Learning Center in honor of Brock Gebhardt, you may donate through paypal at www.lifespathhaiti.org or You may write a check payable to Life's Path and mail to: Brock Gebhardt Memorial c/o Life's Path, 1334 N Independence Ct, Metamora, IL 61548.

Life's Path is a 501(3)c not for profit organization that assists with the development of job opportunities and education to help alleviate extreme poverty through education, micro lending, and teaching job skills.

PHLEBOLOGY GIANT DR JOHN KINGSLEY DIES FOLLOWING ACCIDENT

John R. Kingsley, MD, FACS, RVT, died July 29 following an accident at his home on July 4.

Dr. Kingsley, the first member of the Vein Therapy News Editorial Advisory Board, has been the publication’s most prolific, enduring and passionate supporter. He offered advice on articles and authored dozens of thoughtful and in-depth articles on every aspect of venous treatment. Wherever he traveled on medical business, he spread the word about the publication.

“I believe the editorial credibility that John brought to this publication was critical to our early success, and I will miss him and his personal encouragement and his regular critiques,” said Larry Storer, editor. “John’s friend and colleague, Melanie Petro, MD, will be writing about John in the October issue of Vein Therapy News. Drs. Kingsley and Petro were partners in Petro Cosmetic Surgery and the Alabama Vascular & Vein Center in Birmingham, Ala.

Dr. John Kingsley was the founder and director of the Alabama Vascular & Vein Centers, located in Birmingham, Ala. For the past seven straight years the Consumers Research Council of America has recognized him as one of the top surgeons in the U.S. An internationally acclaimed pioneer and teacher in the surgical treatment of phlebology, he specialized in the treatment of vein disorders and the development of innovative surgical techniques.

He was also the co-founder and director of the Alabama Phlebology Training Institute, one of the premier training centers in the U.S. More than 300 physicians and their supporting staff have learned to use the innovative surgical techniques he helped to develop.

These modern methods have changed the way vein surgery is performed today, and represent some of the greatest advances in vascular and vein treatment in the past 30 to 40 years. Procedures performed by Dr. Kingsley and his colleagues included the diagnosis and treatment of a range of vein disorder problems, from tiny spider veins to large varicose veins to chronic, ulcerated venous ulcers.

Dr. Kingsley practiced many years as a boarded general surgeon and boarded vascular surgeon. He was also board certified by the American Board of Phlebology. He was one of the first physicians in the United States to develop and practice modern vein treatment methods, beginning these new procedures in the year 2000.

A native of Pensacola, Fla., Dr. Kingsley earned his undergraduate and medical degrees from the University of Florida. He trained in surgery at Bethesda Naval Hospital in Bethesda, Md. while serving in the Navy; and he was licensed to practice medicine in Alabama, Georgia and Oregon. He is the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including an appointment as an Emeritus Fellow of the Australasian College of Phlebology.

In 2009, Dr. Kingsley was selected president of the Alabama Vascular Society, an honor he fulfilled for two years. He is past president of the American Society of Outpatient Surgeons, and former chairman of the Surgery Department of Carraway Medical Center in Birmingham. He was a selected Fellow of the American Society of Vascular Surgery and the Southern Association of Vascular Surgeons. Dr. Kingsley was the primary U.S. consultant for the Tokyo Vein Clinic, and in 2007 was selected to the Australasian College of Phlebology as an Emeritus Fellow. He achieved the rank of commander in the U.S. Navy, and was awarded the prestigious honorable discharge upon his completion of service.

He authored more than 100 publications, contributed articles and presentations on vascular and vein surgery methods and techniques.

His phlebology practice was widely known in the South and Gulf Coast region:

  • The Alabama Vein Center is a 7,000-square-foot complex on the mezzanine level of the City Center mall complex of Vestavia Hills. It has four modern operating rooms, and an excellent diagnostic ultrasound facility with the latest ultrasound equipment for diagnosis and for use during procedures.
  • The Atlanta Vein Center opened in December of 2008, and is in Lithia Springs, a suburb of Atlanta. The 4,000-square-foot center includes two operating rooms and all of the support equipment and diagnostic technology.
  • Satellite Clinics The satellite clinics really started in response to requests from patients and from referring physicians. Dr, Kingsley established those clinics for the convenience of patients. There are now busy vein clinics in Tuscaloosa, Oxford, Montgomery and Cullman, Ala.

AVF REGISTERING FOR TWO MEETINGS

  1. THE VEIN FORUM “The Vein Forum: Comprehensive Venous Management for the Practicing Clinician” will be Sept. 5-6 in Boston for practicing venous specialists. The American College of Surgeons designates this live activity for a maximum of 14 AMA PRA Category 1 Credits. Of these AMA PRA Category 1 Credits a maximum of 14 credits meet the requirements for Self-Assessment. Each topic will emphasize the clinical relevance to daily practice. Also, a portion of the course is comprised of panel discussions to allow participants to ask questions as they pertain to the topics discussed and how they relate to their clinical practice. New this year, case-based workshops are incorporated into the course. The faculty will have a variety of simple to complex cases that will be presented to small groups, with the goals of understanding the venous problem, the diagnostic modalities, the treatment options, the end results, and to be able to apply the knowledge in similar scenarios encountered in daily clinical practice. The course will be limited to 50 registered attendees. READ MORE: www.veinforum.org/medical-and-allied-health-professionals/education/the-vein-forum
  2. THE FALL FELLOWS COURSE The Fall 2014 Fellows Course in Venous Disease will be Dec. 5-7 in Houston. The goal of the course is to educate and update fellows regarding the latest theories and developments in the clinical practice of vein disease management. Fellows will gain an overall understanding of vein disease to allow them to successfully incorporate venous knowledge, skills and techniques into their overall practice as they make the transition from training to the clinical practice. READ MORE: www.veinforum.org/medical-and-allied-health-professionals/education/the-vein-forum

AVF’S BSN-JOBST RESEARCH GRANT APPLICATION DUE OCT. 27

The American Venous Forum has set Oct. 27 as the deadline for submission of applications for the BSN-Jobst Research Grant, which has been increased to provide a $100,000 grant for original, basic or clinical research in venous or lymphatic disease. The competition is open to residents, fellows in a vascular training program, as well as physicians who have completed their training within the past five years.

The BSN-JOBST Research Grant provides $50,000 per year for two years, chosen through a competitive peer review selection process. (See Vein Therapy News above, page 4)

Conrad Jobst dedicated his life and expertise to the development of gradient compression garments to better relieve the symptoms of venous disease. Jobst suffered from vascular disease, and his initial line of elastic “stockings” has now evolved into an extensive portfolio of advanced wound care and compression therapy products for the treatment of venous and lymphatic diseases.

In 1995, in association with the AVF, BSN-JOBST initiated the BSN-JOBST Research Fellowship in Venous and Lymphatic Diseases to further Conrad’s legacy of innovation. For almost 20 years, the research developed by grant recipients has helped advance the understanding and treatment of vein diseases. The AVF and BSN medical invite those interested in applying for the 2015 Research Fellowship to submit an application for consideration.

READ MORE:veinforum.org/avf-foundation/bsn-jobst-research-grant-2015

COMMENTS ON SUNSHINE ACT CHANGES DUE SEPT. 2

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services proposed four changes to physician payment transparency rules that could mean major new costs for medical device makers. The proposals are open for comment until Sept. 2 and the rules would take effect Jan.1, 2015, if implemented.

Medicare regulators are looking for feedback on proposed changes to the laws governing transparency in financial relationships between doctors and healthcare companies, warning that the changes may represent a hefty new cost for medical device makers in particular.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services asked healthcare industry stakeholders to offer comments on four proposed modifications to the Physician Payment Sunshine Act, half of which are expected to have little to no practical impact, where the other half may mean a substantial upgrade to existing compliance programs.

According to CMS, the biggest changes are ones that require companies to provide more detail on the transactions between industry and physicians. One proposal would require that companies include the marketed name for medical devices and supplies associated with a payment, rather than giving companies the option of either providing the marketed name, the therapeutic area or the product category. Companies that make drugs and biologics are already required to provide marketed names.

"CMS states that the rationale for the change is to again correct an unintended consequence and to make the reporting requirements consistent," the K&S alert stated.

The other big change is a proposal to draw distinctions between types of value provided to physicians. Manufacturers can currently select "stock, stock options, or any other ownership interest" as a general category of value, but CMS would like to see that broken up into three separate categories for more detailed reporting.

The lower-impact proposals include removing the definition of "covered device" and removing exclusions for payments made to physicians speaking at certain accredited continuing education programs, both of which CMS said were redundant rules.

Featured Contributor



Dr. Deborah L. Manjoney, MD, FACS, RPVI Dr. Manjoney, in an article beginning on page 1, untangled the “Cost Controls” that are costing physicians so much money and time. She opened the Wisconsin Vein Center and MediSpa in 2002, and in 2004 she left her 18-year practice in cardiovascular and thoracic surgery to devote herself to fulltime practice of phlebology. She offers a broad range of non-invasive and minimally invasive services, and she was one of the first in the area to add the “medispa” concept to her practice. She serves on both editorial advisory boards of Vein Therapy News and Aesthetics News Today.

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